Author Archive | Edible Philly

RESTAURANT GUIDE TO THE MAIN LINE & BEYOND

restaurant-guide-main-line
PHOTOGRAPH: COURTESY OF BLACK POWDER TAVERN

Whether you live in the area or are
visiting for the day, here are a few of our
favorite restaurants in Delaware,
Montgomery and Chester counties

BLACK POWDER TAVERN | Located just outside Valley Forge National Historical Park, Black Powder Tavern combines local flavors with American history in a pub-like setting. The menu features a variety of small and entrée-sized plates, which complement the 24 brews on tap. Stop in for lunch, dinner, happy hour or Sunday Brunch!

1164 Valley Forge Road, Wayne
610.293.9333
blackpowdertavern.com

BROAD TABLE TAVERN | Inspired by the seasons, Broad Table Tavern showcases locally sourced ingredients and regional artisan products. The Inn at Swarthmore’s signature restaurant was created to celebrate the partnership with local farms, vineyards, breweries and purveyors who share the same vision for the finest flavors and quality possible.

10 South Chester Road, Swarthmore
610.543.7500
theinnatswat.com/broad-table-tavern

CORNERSTONE | An inviting 22-seat restaurant with a chef’s counter and open kitchen that create an elegant dining experience. The restaurant utilizes high-caliber ingredients highlighting the ever-changing flavors of each season. The perfect marriage of California wine country, coastal New England, and the rustic charm of Europe’s best kept secrets.

1 West Avenue, Wayne
610.688.1888
cornerstonewayne.com

SILVERSPOON | At the Silverspoon, seasonal produce is delivered daily. Fish, exceedingly fresh, arrive from sustainable, best-practice fisheries. Humanely farm-raised meats and poultry are made ready for your enjoyment. Classically trained chefs create dishes that weave this daily bounty into contemporary American tastes, textures and aromas to delight your senses.

503 West Lancaster Avenue, Wayne
610.688.7646
silverspoonwayne.com

THE WHIP TAVERN | This inviting English Pub radiates at the heart of Chester County horse country and serves up traditional pub fare and American favorites such as fish & chips and braised short ribs daily. BYO wine or choose from more than 50 seasonal, local and imported beers.

1383 North Chatham Road, Coatesville
610.383.0600
thewhiptavern.com

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EDIBLE HISTORY: Crossroads Bake Shop

history-crossroads-bake-shop

In a home kitchen, printed recipes might withstand a lifetime of splatters and handwritten notes. But at Crossroads Bake Shop, the library of recipes needs to be reprinted from time to time, thanks to the hard and frequent use they get in a busy, professional kitchen. This pile of well-loved pages was photographed for posterity (and, of course, instagram) before new versions of these time-tested recipes were reprinted and pressed into service. When your breads and pastries are as treasured by the community as those that emerge from the ovens at this Doylestown institution (opened in 1991), you need to have those recipes saved in more than one place.

Crossroads Bake Shop
Crosskeys Plaza, 812 North Easton Road (Route 611), Doylestown
215.348.0828
crossroadsbakeshop.com

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PHILLY FARM & FOOD FEST 17

philly-farm-fest

Locavores,
Level Up
Get to
Philly Farm and Food Fest
on April 8
to Eat Local All Year

You might already know which vegetable CSA you’ll sign up for this year, and of course we’re all counting down to the first farmers’ markets of 2017. But when it comes to eating peak-of-the-season local foods all year long, your choices go way beyond produce. There are seasonal rhythms to cheesemaking, meat production, grain harvesting and beverage fermenting, too.

If you’re in tune to these patterns of the season and get to know your local makers, you can eat even more local foods at their prime. This year’s Philly Farm and Food Fest, hosted by Fair Food and Kitchen Table Consultants, is the perfect opportunity to learn straight from the sources; more than a hundred growers, artisans and makers will be there to talk directly with you, the eager local eater. We talked with a few of them to give you a head start before the event, but seek these purveyors out at the fest to learn more.

ILLUSTRATIONS: JACKIE BOTTO

DAIRY

philly-farm-fest-dairy

Keep your eye on a local cheese case (like the one at Farm Food Farmstand), and you’ll notice certain patterns. For example, it’s hard to find chèvre or ricotta in the winter. Small-scale farmstead cheesemakers depend on the natural lactation cycles of their animals, which means that the quantity and quality of milk changes throughout the year.

Catherine and Al Renzi’s goats at Yellow Springs Farm in Chester Springs are bred naturally, meaning they have their kids in March. “Goats will provide milk for about 250 days after they give birth,” Catherine says. “There’s very little milk in January and February.” For that reason, Yellow Springs’ fresh cheeses— chèvre, feta and “goat-za-rella”—are only available May through October, when the milk is flowing heavily. It’s also when goats graze on fresh pasture and forage, which lends a floral, grassy flavor to the milk—that’s why Catherine says her ripened cheeses, Black Diamond and Cloud Nine, are best in the spring.

Deeply savory, aged cheeses get us through the low-milk months, like Yellow Springs’ award-winning Nutcracker. Aged in walnut liqueur that the Renzis make each year from the fruit of their native trees, it’s released each November.

To learn about the peak seasons of more local cheeses, talk to these vendors at the fest:

Yellow Springs Farm
1165 Yellow Springs Road, Chester Springs
610.827.2014
yellowspringsfarm.com

Cherry Grove Farm
3200 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville, NJ
609.219.0053
cherrygrovefarm.com

Dutch Meadows Organic Dairy
694 Country Ln., Paradise
717.442.9208

GRAIN

philly-farm-fest-grain

Yes, grains are a storage crop we’re used to getting year-round—that’s the whole point. But, unlike commercially processed flour that can sit in the pantry for years, freshly milled flours do have a shelf life. “The difference in what we do and industrial flour [production] is we mill to order,” says Mark Fischer, co-owner of Castle Valley Mill in Doylestown.

When Northeastern farmers harvest their wheat and rye (midsummer) and dry corn (fall), the mills buys the entire crop and stores it in thousand-bushel grain bins. “Grain is actually a living product,” Fischer says. “It stays in seed form until we get the orders and then we mill it fresh.” Their flour still contains all the natural components (bran, germ, and endosperm), which give it robust flavor and nutrition—and a shorter shelf life.

Freshly milled flour will keep in the fridge for about six months, but the fresher the better, Fischer says. “We encourage people to use it quickly and order more.”

Talk to these makers and bakers about local grains:

Castle Valley Mill
1730 Lower State Road., Doylestown
215.340.3609
castlevalleymill.com

Green Meadow Farm
1030 Mt. Vernon Rd., Gap
717.442.5222
glennbrendle.com

High Street on Market
308 Market St., Philadelphia
215.625.0988
highstreetonmarket.com

MEAT

philly-farm-fest-meat

You can easily buy high-quality local meat year-round— just be flexible about which cuts you cook with. Small-scale butchers often work with whole animals, so don’t expect a high volume of certain cuts—like flank steaks, for example (there are just two per beef cow). Butchers like Nick Macri at La Divisa Meats know that customers have seasonal cravings for distinct cuts—chops and steaks for grilling in the summer, roasts in the winter—so he gets creative. “In the summertime we slice lamb’s neck—a typical braising cut—really thin and marinate it in a Korean barbecue sauce, so it’s grill-able,” he says.

Though La Divisa works with whole animals from local farmers year round, certain meats do have a brief window of availability, like the veal that Macri occasionally gets from Birchrun Hills Farm. Birchrun’s calves are raised on their mother’s milk and pasture, resulting in what’s referred to as “rose veal.” “It’s still young and very tender,” Macri says, “but you can tell there was blood flow and oxygen because it has this brighter color.” The prized veal is generally available in the late fall.

Learn more tips for finding the best local meats in season from these vendors:

La Divisa Meats
51 N. 12th St., Philadelphia
(inside Reading Terminal)
215.627.2100
ladivisameats.com

Lancaster Farm Fresh
717.656.3533
lancasterfarmfresh.com

Birchrun Hills Farm
2573 Horseshoe Trail, Chester Springs
birchrunhillsfarm.com

BEVERAGES

philly-farm-fest-beverages

Contrary to what you might think, many small brewers aren’t making their craft beers and ciders year round. They’re doing it only when the ingredients are in peak season, to make the best tasting beverages. Though they’re bottled to keep, some are just better fresh.

Take Ploughman’s Cider, which Three Springs Fruit Farm introduced last December. “We really want our product to appeal to discerning craft-beverage appreciators,” owner Ben Wenk says. “The best way for us to do that is to squeeze the best apples we can grow on Three Springs Fruit Farm when they’re at their optimal best.” The apples are pressed in late fall and early winter, fermented for four to six weeks and then left to mature for up to six months—which means that the best cider is actually available in the spring.

“Cider is best enjoyed fresh,” Wenk says. Ploughman freezes some of the fresh-pressed fall juice and makes a batch in the early summer, so we can still get our hands on fresh cider in the fall and into the holiday season. Talk to these vendors to learn about more seasonal drinks.

Oma Teas
omaherbalteas.com

Ploughman Cider
1606 Bendersville-Wenksville Road, Aspers
(by appointment only)
ploughmancider.com

Stark Juice
9957 Kunkels Mill Road, Kempton
801.557.0832
starkjuice.com

VEGGIES FOREVER

Of course, fresh produce from our vegetable farmers is the cornerstone of local eating. If you’re strategic, you won’t have to forgo midwinter cravings for fresh flavors. Sign up for a winter CSA or shop at the Fair Food Farmstand, which stocks storage crops like winter squash, potatoes, carrots, cabbage, beets and apples all year. And of course—we’ve said it before and we’ll say it again—freeze, can, pickle and ferment! If you don’t have time to stand over big pots of tomato sauce or blueberry jam in the height of the summer, support local makers (like Brine Street Picklery, Spruce Hill Preserves and Food and Ferments) who make it their mission to preserve the best of the season.

PHILLY FARM & FOOD FEST
SATURDAY, APRIL 8
PA CONVENTION CENTER
PHILLYFARMFEST.ORG


MEET YOUR MAKERS

Over 150 of the region’s best farmers, chefs and food and beverage artisans.… Read More

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Spring 2017 Table of Contents

DEPARTMENTS

4 AT THE TABLE
6 CONTRIBUTORS
10 THE FOOD LIFE
14 FIRST PERSON
38 ROAD TRIP: Main Line
42 COOKSHELF: Ann Karlen
44 GLOBAL CITY: Poke
47 ADVERTISER DIRECTORY
48 EDIBLE HISTORY

FEATURES

16 LOCAL HEROES
Edible Philly’s 2017 award winners
26 SPECIAL SECTION:
Philly Farm & Food Fest
30 CRACKING THE CODE
Why is buying a dozen eggs so confusing?
34 A TOUR OF FOOD ART
Walking through the Philadelphia Museum of Art on an empty stomach

RECIPES

12 Spring Onions
43 Vegetable Pot Pie

 toc-philly-spring-2017

COVER:
Eggs Benedict with berries and an iced
cappuccino at The Classic Diner in Malvern.
Photograph by Rebecca McAlpin

THIS PAGE:
Farm fresh, pastured eggs.
Photograph by Carole Topalian

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MARKETPLACE ADVERTISER DIRECTORY

Our advertising partners make Edible Philly possible. Be sure to thank them by supporting their businesses this season. And be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in Edible Philly!

BAKERIES

SWEET LADYBUG BAKED GOODS | Sweet Ladybug’s products are handmade from scratch and use local ingredients when available. Gluten free done right! Find them at farmers markets and festivals in the Philadelphia area. 267.471.7338. sweetladybugbakes.com

BEVERAGES (NON-ALCOHOLIC)

YOGI TEA | Over 100 exotic herbs and botanicals from around the world combine to create sweet and spicy herbal teas. Available at local retailers and online. yogiproducts.com

EDUCATION AND EVENTS

DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY | This University offers a 36-credit, one-year organic farming program in partnership with Rodale Institute, which gives graduates the knowledge and experience necessary to start a small-scale, organic farm. 700 E Butler Ave, Doylestown, 215.489.2904. delval.edu

KITCHEN TABLE CONSULTANTS | Their goal is simple: to help passionate farmers and food artisans build lasting, profitable, locally-focused businesses. They use real-world experience and no stuffy business plans. 112 Righters Ferry Road, Bala Cynwyd, 267.275.1198. kitchentableconsultants.com

PA PREFERRED | The State Department of Agriculture launched PA Preferred to identify and promote agricultural products grown, produced or processed in Pennsylvania. Buy local to encourage Pennsylvania businesses to grow and create great products. papreferred.com

PHILLY FARM & FOOD FEST | The Philly Farm & Food Fest is one of the country’s biggest and best single-day food festivals and a perfect way to kick off the spring harvest season. Join them on April 8 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. phillyfarmfest.org

FARMS, DAIRIES & CSAs

BOBOLINK DAIRY & BAKEHOUSE | Renowned for farmstead cheeses crafted from the milk of grass-fed herds, Jonathan and Nina White also produce artisanal breads. Visit to tour and buy or shop online. 369 Stamets Road, Milford, NJ, 908.86.GRASS. cowsoutside.com

CROSS COUNTRY NURSERIES | Located in rural Hunterdon County and growing organic chile plants since 1993, this husband-and-wife team also offers organically raised eggplant, pepper and tomato plants. 199 Kingwood-Locktown Road, Stockton, NJ, info@chileplants.com. chileplants.com

GREENSGROW FARMS | Greensgrow is a nationally recognized leader in urban farming; rethinking land, abandoned space, ideas, oil barrels, PVC, tools and trash is what they do. Greensgrow is open year round. 2501 East Cumberland Street, Philadelphia, 215.427.2780. greensgrow.org

LANCASTER FARM FRESH COOPERATIVE | LFFC is a nonprofit of over 100 family farmers focused on providing fresh, certified-organic fruits, vegetables and other farm fresh products through a CSA program. 201 Running Pump Road, Lancaster, 717.656.3533. lancasterfarmfresh.com

SEVEN STARS FARM | Seven Stars is a certified biodynamic dairy that has been using milk from their Jersey and Jersey-crossed herd to produce pure organic yogurt since 1987. 501 West Seven Stars Road, Phoenixville, 610.935.1949. sevenstarsfarm.com

ZONE 7 | Named after our growing zone, distributor Zone 7 delivers the freshest organic and sustainable ingredients from local farms to restaurants and grocers. Contact Mikey Azzara at 609.896.0190 or visit their website for information and events. freshfromzone7.com

GROCERS, FOOD EMPORIUMS

ALTOMONTE’S ITALIAN MARKET | This family-owned Italian market and deli has been serving “only the best from our family to yours” for over 40 years. Catering services also available. 85 North York Road, Warminster, 215.672.5439, and 856 North Easton Road, Doylestown, 215.489.8889. Altomontes.com

CARLINO’S—MAKERS AND PURVEYORS OF ARTISAN FOOD | Third-generation specialty food grocer specializing in artisan cheeses, house-made desserts, signature pastas and sauces, handmade fresh bread, prepared gourmet take-away foods, fresh produce, delicatessen and more. 2616 East County Line Road, Ardmore, 610.649.4046, and 128 West Market Street, West Chester, 610.696.3788. carlinosmarket.com

READING TERMINAL MARKET | Mouthwatering aromas. Produce fresh from the field. Amish specialties. Fresh meats, seafood and poultry. It’s all here and more at Philadelphia’s historic farmers market. Open daily. 12th and Arch. readingterminalmarket.org

WEGMANS | Devoted to helping their customers eat well and named one of the best 100 companies to work for in 2010 by Fortune magazine, Wegmans food markets are located throughout the greater Philadelphia area. wegmans.com

INNS AND B&Bs

THE GABLES BED & BREAKFAST | Nestled within the University City section of Philadelphia, this Victorian B&B offers 10 beautifully appointed rooms, off-street parking and a full breakfast crafted from farm-fresh ingredients. 4520 Chester Avenue, Philadelphia, 215.662.1918. gablesbb.com

WINE & SPIRITS

FINE WINE & GOOD SPIRITS | With an expanded selection of 2,000 wines and spirits to choose from, convenient Sunday hours and product experts ready to help, our Premium Collection stores in Pennsylvania are your one-stop shop. finewineandgoodspirits.com

HOPEWELL VALLEY VINEYARDS | Blending old world flair with new world style, this winery brings the Tuscan winemaking experience to the beautiful Hopewell Valley. Enjoy tastings, live music and mountain views. 46 Yard Road, Pennington, NJ, 609.737.4465. hopewellvalleyvineyards.com

TROEGS INDEPENDENT BREWING | With year-round and seasonal brews, their lineup features hoppy ales and captivating lagers as well as wheat beers and Belgian-style ales. Visit their tasting room in Hershey. troegs.com

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Vegetable Pot Pie

recipe-veg-pot-pie

Serves 4

1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed
2 cups herb béchamel (note: any homemade or store-bought béchamel may be used)
1½ pounds butternut squash, peeled and diced into 1-inch cubes
Flour, for dredging
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons butter
16 shallots or boiling onions, peeled and left whole
1 small celery root
Juice of 1 lemon
3 parsnips, peeled and diced
2 kohlrabi or turnips, peeled and cut into wedges
5 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch lengths
Sea salt and freshly milled pepper
4 thyme sprigs
½ cup cream or milk
1 egg, beaten

Choose a 2-quart soufflé or gratin dish or four individual 2-cup casseroles. Roll out the pastry between and ¼ inch thick and cut it to fit the dish. Cut out leaves or other decorative shapes from the scraps. Refrigerate the pastry until needed. Have the béchamel cooking in a double boiler while you prepare the vegetables.

Toss the squash in flour, letting the excess fall away. Heat the oil and butter in a large skillet and add the squash and shallots. Sauté over medium heat until browned and tender, 20 to 30 minutes, stirring occasionally so that they color evenly. Transfer to the baking dish.

Peel the celery root, dice it into 1-inch cubes, and put them in the bowl with the juice plus water to cover. Parboil the remaining vegetables in salted water until tender but still a little firm. Drain, then parboil the celery root for 1 minute. Combine all the vegetables, season with salt and pepper, and transfer the stew to the dish. Tuck in the thyme sprigs.

Mix the béchamel and cream or milk and pour it over the vegetables, allowing the sauce to fall between the cracks. Refrigerate if baking later, then bring to room temperature before baking.

When ready to bake, preheat the oven to 425°F. Remove the pastry from the refrigerator and lay it on top of the vegetables. Brush the top with egg; add any decorations and glaze them, too. Bake for 12 minutes, then lower the heat to 350°F and continue baking until the crust is golden and puffed and the sauce is bubbling, 15 to 20 minutes more. Let settle for a few minutes, then serve. 

recipe-veg-pot-pie-cookbook

Reprinted with permission from The New Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, copyright 2014 by Deborah Madison. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprinting of Penguin Random House LLC. Book cover illustrations copyright 2014 by Yana Beylinson.

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Winter 2016-2017 Table of Contents

DEPARTMENTS

4 AT THE TABLE
6 CONTRIBUTORS
9 THE FOOD LIFE
14 FIRST PERSON
38 COOKSHELF
42 ROAD TRIP: HADDONFIELD, NJ
46 ADVERTISER DIRECTORY
48 EDIBLE HISTORY

FEATURES

16 THE CRUMB TRAIL
Tracing Philadelphia’s local grain supply chain
24 THIRTY-SEVEN CHOCOLATES
My foray into the world of American craft chocolate
30 HEALTHY DECADENCE
How Andrea Kyan satiates a sweet tooth at her vegan, gluten-free restaurant and bakery, P.S. & Co.
 34 TO KEG OR NOT TO KEG
As wine taps proliferate throughout the city, local wine producers are divided on how to respond

RECIPES

11 Celery Root
36 Apple Cinnamon Cake with Brown Butter
44 Butternut Squash and Mushroom Bread Pudding with Bourbon Cherries

 tocephilwin1617

COVER:
Layer cake from P.S. & Co.
Photograph by Rebecca McAlpin

THIS PAGE:
At dusk, holiday lights create magic on
Kings Highway in Haddonfield, NJ.
Photograph by Thomas Robert Clarke

 

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EDIBLE HISTORY: OYSTER HOUSE

historyoysterhouse
PHOTOGRAPH: COURTESY OF OYSTER HOUSE

2016 marked Oyster House’s 40th birthday—a milestone shared by second-generation Oyster House owner Sam Mink, who was born the year his father opened the restaurant. Through the decades, the fish house has been a place to toast the holiday season for many of its regulars and longtime fans. “Freshly shucked oysters and a few glasses of nice sparkling wine are the perfect way to get in the festive spirit,” says Mink. We couldn’t agree more.

But holidays celebrations aside, the cold-weather months are simply when oysters taste their best. “Oysters sense the weather cooling down and they begin to store polysaccharides or glycogen— sugar. It’s like the oysters are carb-loading for the winter, which in turn makes the oyster plump and sweet,” says Mink. He should know—he has been honing his expertise since around the time of the picture here, where a five-year-old Sam Mink slurps the 1981 crop of bivalves. —JM

Oyster House
1516 Sansom St.
215.567.7683
oysterhousephilly.com

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MARKETPLACE ADVERTISER DIRECTORY

Our advertising partners make Edible Philly possible. Be sure to thank them by supporting their businesses this season. And be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in Edible Philly!

EVENTS & DESTINATIONS

PHILLY FARM & FOOD FEST | The Philly Farm & Food Fest is one of the country’s biggest and best single-day food festivals and a perfect way to kick off the spring harvest season. Join them on April 8, 2017 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. phillyfarmfest.org

FARMS, FARM MARKETS & CSAs

GRIGGSTOWN FARM | Known for their humanely raised poultry, Griggstown offers their homemade pot pies, fresh and frozen poultry, and specialty foods at quality retail shops and restaurants throughout PA and in their own on-farm market. 986 Canal Road, Princeton, NJ, 908.359.5218. griggstownfarm.com

ZONE 7 | Named after our growing zone, distributor Zone 7 delivers the freshest organic and sustainable ingredients from local farms to restaurants and grocers. Contact Mikey Azzara at 609.896.0190 or visit their website for information and events. freshfromzone7.com

GOURMET/SPECIALTY FOODS & BEVERAGES

LE GRUYERE | Made with the same recipe for more than 900 years, Le Gruyere creates cheese with a creamy, floral flavor, bold taste, and crystalline texture. For recipes and more visit gruyere.com

METROPOLITAN BAKERY | Metropolitan Bakery has become a Philadelphia institution. Its breads and confections are served in many of the city’s finest restaurants and in specialty stores throughout the U.S. See website for locations. metropolitanbakery.com

MUIRHEAD FOODS | Muirhead’s all natural fine food products, including chutneys, jellies, fruit butters, mincemeats, cooking sauces, vinaigrettes, and mustards, enhance baked products and daily meals. Gift packages available. 800.782.7803. muirheadfoods.com

SAN PELLEGRINO | Naturally filtered over 30 years by the Italian Alps and bottled at the source in Bergamo, Italy, S.Pellegrino has been a key ingredient in exceptional meals since 1899. sanpellegrino.com

TRICKLING SPRINGS CREAMERY | Using milk from local, family farms that take the best care of their animals and land, Trickling Springs Creamery provides fresh, wholesome dairy product. Available at area stores and through their own shop. 2330 Molly Pitcher Highway, Chambersburg, 717.709.0711. tricklingspringscreamery.com

YOGI TEA | Over 100 exotic herbs and botanicals from around the world combine to create sweet and spicy herbal teas. Available at local retailers and online. yogiproducts.com

GROCERS, FOOD EMPORIUMS

ALTOMONTE’S ITALIAN MARKET | This family-owned Italian market and deli has been serving “only the best from our family to yours” for over 40 years. Catering services also available. 85 North York Road, Warminster, 215.672.5439 and their new location at 856 North Easton Road, Doylestown, 215.489.8889. altomontes.com

CARLINO’S—MAKERS AND PURVEYORS OF ARTISAN FOOD | Third generation specialty food grocer specializing in artisan cheeses, house made desserts, signature pasta and sauces, handmade fresh bread, prepared gourmet take-away foods, fresh produce, delicatessen, and more. 2616 East County Line Road, Ardmore, and 128 West Market Street, West Chester, 610.649.4046, carlinosmarket.com

READING TERMINAL MARKET | Mouth-watering aromas. Produce fresh from the field. Amish specialties. Fresh meats, seafood, and poultry. It’s all here and more at Philadelphia’s historic farmers market. Open daily. 12th and Arch. readingterminalmarket.org

WEGMANS | Devoted to helping their customers eat well and named one of the 100 Best Companies to Work for in 2010 by Fortune magazine, Wegmans food markets are located throughout the greater Philadelphia area. wegmans.com

INNS AND B&Bs

THE GABLES BED & BREAKFAST | Nestled within the University City section of Philadelphia, this Victorian B&B offers 10 beautifully appointed rooms, off-street parking and a full breakfast crafted from farm-fresh ingredients. 4520 Chester Avenue, Philadelphia, 215.662.1918. gablesbb.com

WINE & SPIRITS

ALBA VINEYARD | Nationally recognized as one of the East Coast’s most award-winning wineries, Alba’s mission is to sustainably farm estate quality fruit and craft premium wines of exceptional value. Open for tastings every day! 269 Riegelsville Warren Glen Road, Village of Finesville, Milford, NJ, 908.995.7800. albavineyard.com

CHADDSFORD WINERY | Founded in 1982, the winery offers wines for every palate, which are locally sourced and produced onsite. Unique events happen every weekend of the year. 632 Baltimore Pike, Chadds Ford, 610.388.6221. chaddsford.com

FLYING FISH BREWING CO. | Flying Fish is the most decorated and sustainably focused of New Jersey’s craft breweries and is available at retailers and restaurants throughout the region. Visit their tasting room Wednesday- Sunday. 900 Kennedy Boulevard, Somerdale, NJ. flyingfish.com

HOPEWELL VALLEY VINEYARDS | Blending Old World fl air with New World style, the winery brings the Tuscan winemaking experience to the beautiful Hopewell Valley. Enjoy tastings, live music and mountain views. 46 Yard Road, Pennington, NJ, 609.737.4465. hopewellvalleyvineyards.com; enjoyhopewellvalleywines.com

FINE WINE & GOOD SPIRITS | With an expanded selection of 2,000 wines and spirits to choose from, convenient Sunday hours and product experts ready to help, our Premium Collection stores in Pennsylvania are your one-stop-holiday-shop. finewineandgoodspirits.com

TROEGS INDEPENDENT BREWING | With year-round and seasonal brews, their lineup features hoppy ales and captivating lagers, as well as wheat beers and Belgian-style ales. Visit their tasting room in Hershey. troegs.com

UNITED STATES ASSOCIATION OF CIDER MAKERS | Cider can range from sweet to dry and pairs exceptionally well with food. For information about cider production, cider regulations, and cider apple growing, visit cidereassociation.org

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ROAD TRIP: HOLIDAY MAGIC IN HADDONFIELD

One historic town knows how
to make the season sparkle

 haddonfield

PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS ROBERT CLARKE

Haddonfield can seem downright Dickensian at times, particularly on December nights when luminarias line the sidewalks and a horse and buggy chauffeur visitors around town. From Thanksgiving weekend until New Year’s Eve, Haddonfield revels in the holiday spirit with a charm that attracts throngs of shoppers, diners and families.

“Haddonfield is a destination during the holidays,” says Julie Beddingfield, owner of the independent Inkwood Books in Haddonfield. “It’s festive and a throwback.”

Most of the merriment happens downtown, along Kings Highway, but it spills into the alleyways, side streets and along Haddon Avenue for several blocks. Visitors can take advantage of free parking during the season—or take the Patco train, which drops riders right in the center of things—and then take a leisurely stroll through town.

haddonfield2
Christmas carolers gather in Kings Court

This quaint Camden County town dates back to 1662, when Quakers settled here. Named for landowner John Haddon, a wealthy London businessman who never set foot in the town, Haddonfield was officially founded in 1713. The New Jersey legislature met in the Indian King Tavern during the Revolutionary War; the tavern still exists and is now a museum. The first mostly complete skeleton of a dinosaur found in North America was uncovered in town and is commemorated with a sculpture on Kings Highway. Visiting Haddonfield for its history and shopping district is a treat any time of year, but it’s even more fun during the holidays.

The season kicks off the day after Thanksgiving. While the malls and big-box stores are claustrophobic, with shoppers fighting over TVs and gaming consoles, shoppers in Haddonfield find fresh air and unusual gifts at boutiques, galleries, jewelers and culinary shops. They walk among trees wrapped in twinkling lights, past singers strolling the streets, and through a downtown that feels like a magical village.

“The weekend after Thanksgiving has grown into Small Business Weekend,” says Remi Fortunato, retail recruiter for the Partnership for Haddonfield. It’s an extension of American Express’s annual Small Business Saturday, which encourages seasonal shoppers to spend some of their holiday budgets at independent and small businesses.

“Haddonfield emphasizes ‘shop small’ throughout the whole holiday season,” Fortunato says. It’s the quintessential small-business district.

Candlelight Shopping nights begin in 2016 on Friday, November 25 from 6 to 9pm. Luminarias line the walkways, stores stay open a little later and the borough’s holiday tree at Library Point will be lit at 6:30pm. This is also when Santa arrives on a fire truck as part of the parade. Horse-drawn carriage rides and musical performances up and down Kings Highway make the start of the holidays in Haddonfield complete.

 haddonfield3
Traditional holiday treats are easy to find at a variety of shops in Haddonfield

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After candlelight shopping, take a leisurely ride in a horse and buggy around town.

Candlelight Shopping happens each Friday night between Thanksgiving and Christmas. This year there are five Friday nights, giving visitors an extra night in the magical village. There are also two late shopping nights this year—Monday, December 19, and Thursday, December 22—when many shops will stay open until midnight. Any night is perfect to dine in Haddonfield, but several local restaurants create an especially festive atmosphere this time of year.

“Downtown is really charming, especially at holiday time,” says Edward Strojan, a partner in Haddonfield’s British Chip Shop restaurant, which celebrates the culinary traditions of the British Isles.

“There are many shops to find really good gifts that you can’t find in the mall. It’s a good place to come with families or friends to eat and bring a bottle of wine. “

The British Chip Shop does the holidays up right, with prix-fixe Dickens Christmas Roasts every weekend in December. Traditional dishes, including roast beef and stuffed pork loin, are served with accompaniments like Yorkshire pudding. Diners are encouraged to bring their own wine or beer.

If you want traditional British desserts and pastries, this is where you’ll find them. The British Chip Shop makes treats to order— Christmas puddings, mince pies, gingerbread men and women, Christmas scones and traditional fruitcakes that you’ll want to eat, not use as a door-stopper.

“We start our fruitcakes in October,” says Strojan. “Dried fruit sits in brandy and macerates before being used in the cakes. The cakes get washes of simple syrup and more brandy. By the time they are ready to go, they are dense and moist—really good.”

Another event you won’t find anywhere else is an airing of the Doctor Who Christmas Special. Fans gather at the British Chip Shop on Christmas Day to watch the TV show while feasting on specials like deviled alien eggs and Dalek cakes based on the wildly popular BBC series.

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Pineapples are a symbol of hospitality, and Haddonfield’s welcoming
spirit is evident, even in the town’s holiday décor.

“Haddonfield emphasizes ‘shop small’ throughout
the whole holiday season,” Fortunato says.
It’s the quintessential small-business district.

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A shop window decked for the season with a nutcracker.

For traditional American sweets, Sweet T’s Bakeshop in King’s Court is the place to go for all things pumpkin—including pie, cheesecake, scones and pumpkin-maple cupcakes.

During “25 Days of Christmas,” Sweet T’s bakers get creative, with a different cupcake every day. Buddy the Elf, Rudolph and Santa’s Belly are just a few of the holiday-themed toppers. They also serve peppermint lattes and flavored coffees.

“Haddonfield is a dry town with many BYO restaurants,” says Fortunato. “Some of them sell bottles of wine from New Jersey wineries. Jersey Java has Auburn Road wines, Tre Familia has Sharrott, and Zaffron Mediterranean Cuisine has Hawk Haven. Anyone can buy a bottle of wine from these places and take it home or to another restaurant.”

In the Kitchen Cooking School offers gifts and a full cooking-class schedule. “We have non-stop classes for the holidays,” says owner chef Kathy Gold. “For Thanksgiving, we offer timing classes for the meal, a class that focuses just on sides, a vegan/vegetarian class, and a class that teaches the whole shebang.”

In the Kitchen’s holiday classes start the first week in November. Booking ahead is recommended.

“Every class is a party,” Gold adds. “People can bring their own alcohol, but we wait to drink it until the cooking is done. Pairing knives and booze is not a good idea.”

One of Gold’s most popular classes is the Cookie Exchange. “We do two Cookie Exchange classes that are open to 20 people,” says Gold. “We bake 12 different kinds of cookies.” Participants leave with a tin full of homemade holiday cookies and go home to a clean kitchen.

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At dusk, holiday lights create magic on Kings Highway.

For specialty culinary gifts and spices for holiday cooking, baking and drink making, Hannah’s Gourmet has it covered. The store sells more than 300 spices, including salts and peppers, and carries the difficult-to-find ground mace that’s used in many old-world recipes. “We also make our own mulling spice blend,” says owner Monika Harris. The blend smells just like Christmas and can be used in red wine, apple cider or cranberry juice.

A short, luminaria-lit stroll down from the spice store is A Taste of Olive, its walls lined with extra-virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegars of the highest quality.

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